LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Boateng, Joshua S.; Matthews, Kerr H.; Auffret, Anthony D.; Humphrey, Mike J.; Eccleston, Gillian M.; Stevens, Howard N. (2012)
Publisher: Informa Healthcare
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: QD, RS
Drug release characteristics of freeze-dried wafers and solvent-cast films prepared from sodium carboxymethylcellulose have been investigated and compared. In vitro drug dissolution studies were performed using an exchange cell and drug release was measured by UV spectroscopy at 272 nm using distilled water. The dissolution profiles of hydrochlorothiazide from the wafers and films were compared by determining the rates of drug release, estimated from the % release versus time profiles and calculating their difference (f1) and similarity (f2) factors. The effects of drug loading, polymer content and amount of glycerol (GLY) (films) on the drug release characteristics of both formulations were investigated. Both the wafers and films showed sustained type release profiles that were best explained by the Korsmeyer–Peppas equation. Changes in the concentration of drug and GLY (films) did not significantly alter the release profiles whilst increasing polymer content significantly decreased the rate of drug release from both formulations. The rate of release was faster from the wafers than the corresponding films which could be attributed to differences in the physical microstructure. The results show the potential of employing both formulations in various mucosal drug delivery applications.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article