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Owens M. J.; Cliver E.; McCracken K. G.; Beer J.; Barnard L.; Lockwood M.; Rouillard A.; Passos D.; Riley P.; Usoskin I.; Wang Y. -M. (2016)
Journal: JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-SPACE PHYSICS
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
This is Part 2 of a study of the near-Earth heliospheric magnetic field strength, B, since 1750. Part 1 produced composite estimates of B from geomagnetic and sunspot data over the period 1750–2013. Sunspot-based reconstructions can be extended back to 1610, but the paleocosmic ray (PCR) record is the only data set capable of providing a record of solar activity on millennial timescales. The process for converting 10Be concentrations measured in ice cores to B is more complex than with geomagnetic and sunspot data, and the uncertainties in B derived from cosmogenic nuclides (~20% for any individual year) are much larger. Within this level of uncertainty, we find reasonable overall agreement between PCR-based B and the geomagnetic- and sunspot number-based series. This agreement was enhanced by excising low values in PCR-based B attributed to high-energy solar proton events. Other discordant intervals, with as yet unspecified causes remain included in our analysis. Comparison of 3 year averages centered on sunspot minimum yields reasonable agreement between the three estimates, providing a means to investigate the long-term changes in the heliospheric magnetic field into the past even without a means to remove solar proton events from the records.

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