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Macdonald, Alastair S.; Loudon, David; Docherty, Catherine (2009)
Publisher: New Dynamics of Ageing, University of Sheffield
Languages: English
Types: Other
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: ComputingMethodologies_COMPUTERGRAPHICS
This research evaluated an innovative way of communicating and understanding the complexity of older people’s mobility problems using visualisations of objective dynamic movement data. In previous research, a prototype software tool was created, which visualises, for non-biomechanical specialists and lay audiences, dynamic biomechanical data captured from older people undertaking activities of daily living. From motion capture data and muscle strength measurements, a 3D animated human ‘stick figure’ was generated,on which the biomechanical demands of the activities were represented visually at the joints (represented as a percentage of maximum capability, using a continuous colour gradient from green at 0%, amber at 50% through to red at 100%). The potential healthcare and design applications for the visualisations were evaluated through a series of interviews and focus groups with older people, and healthcare and design professionals, and through a specialist workshop for professionals.
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