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Bird, E.; Oliver, B. (2016)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Background: This study assessed short-term changes in children’s health and illness attitudes and health status following Facts4Life, a school-based health education intervention.\ud \ud Methods: Children aged 7-11 years (School Years 3-6) recruited from 10 schools in the UK participated in this study. A quasi-experimental design was utilised with 187 children participating in the intervention, and 108 forming a control condition. Children in both conditions completed measures of health and illness attitudes and health status at baseline and at immediate follow-up. Intervention effects were examined using mixed between-within subjects ANOVA.\ud \ud Results: Analysis revealed significant baseline to follow-up improvements in intervention group responses to “When I feel unwell I need to take medicine to feel better” (Years 3 and 4: p = 0.05, η2p = 0.02; Years 5 and 6: p = 0.004, η2p = 0.07). For intervention group children in Years 5 and 6 there was an improvement in response to “When I am ill, I always need to see a doctor” (p = 0.01, η2p = 0.07). There was no evidence that Facts4Life had an impact upon health status. \ud \ud Conclusions: This study identified some positive intervention effects and results suggest that Facts4Life has potential as a school-based health education intervention.
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