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May, A.D.; Waring, D.A.; Weaver, P.M. (1983)
Publisher: Institute of Transport Studies, University of Leeds
Languages: English
Types: Book
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: human activities
This report presents the results of a before study of some effects of the introduction of wheel clamps in Central London. Park and visit, vehicle following, registration number and business interview surveys were conducted in two areas of Central London: Mayfair in which wheel clamps were to be introduced, and Bloomsbury where they were not. The surveys were designed to determine the availability of parking spaces, the extent to which vehicles searched for parking spaces, the time spent doing so and gaining access to destinations, the level of through traffic, and the parking problems perceived by businesses. They were complementary to a series of surveys conducted by consultants for TRRL. \ud \ud The report describes the design and piloting of the surveys, presents the results of the surveys, identifies the levels of change which it will be possible statistically to detect and makes recommendations for the after surveys. In particular it recommends that the park and visit and vehicle following surveys be repeated, and also presents arguments in favour of repeating the business survey and conducting a survey on trade.

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