LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Morton, John (2016)
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
This article considers the work of three contemporary poets and their engagement, in verse, with Victorian science. Beginning with the outlandish ‘theories’ of Mick Imlah’s ‘The Zoologist’s Bath’ (1983), it moves on to two works of biografiction – Anthony Thwaite’s poem ‘At Marychurch’ (1980), which outlines Philip Henry Gosse’s doomed attempts to unite evolution and Christianity, and Ruth Padel’s Darwin: A Life in Poems (2009). Starting off with John Glendening’s idea that science in neo-Victorian fiction, if fully embraced, provides an opportunity for self-revelation to characters, this article explores the rather less happy resolutions of each of these poems, while in addition discussing the ways in which these poems perform the formal changes and mutability discussed within them.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • Beer, Gillian. Darwin's Plots. London: Routledge, 1983.
    • Blair, Kirstie. Victorian Poetry and the Culture of the Heart. Oxford: OUP, 2006.
    • Brown, Daniel. The Poetry of Victorian Scientists: Style, Science and Nonsense. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.
    • Bormann, Daniel Candell. The Articulation of Science in the Neo-Victorian Novel. Oxford: Peter Lang, 2002.
    • Brindle, Kym. 'Dead Words and Fatal Secrets: Rediscovering the Sensational Document in NeoVictorian Fiction', Neo-Victorian Gothic: Horror, Violence and Degeneration in the ReImagined Nineteenth Century. Eds. Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2012.279-300.
    • Dickens, Charles. Bleak House. Ed. Nicola Bradbury. London: Penguin, 2003.
    • Fuller, John. “The Early Poetry of Mick Imlah.” Oxford Poetry 13.2 (2009):13-21.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article