LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Bowers, L.; Flood, C.; Brennan, G.; Allan, T. (2008)
Publisher: BLACKWELL PUBLISHING
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: RT
Conflict and containment on acute inpatient psychiatric wards pose a threat to patient and staff safety, and it is desirable to minimize the frequency of these events. Research has indicated that certain staff attitudes and behaviours might serve to accomplish this, namely, positive appreciation, emotional regulation and effective structure. A previous test of an intervention based on these principles, on two wards, showed a good outcome. In this study, we tested the same intervention on three further wards. Two ‘City nurses’ were employed to work with three acute wards, assisting with the implementation of changes according to the working model of conflict and containment generation. Evaluation was via before-and-after measures, with parallel data collected from five control wards. While simple before-and-after analysis of the two experimental wards showed significant reductions in conflict and containment, when a comparison with controls was conducted, with control for patient occupancy and clustering of results by ward, no effect of the intervention was found. The results were therefore ambiguous, and neither confirm nor contradict the efficacy of the intervention. A further intervention study may need to be conducted with a larger sample size to achieve adequate statistical power.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article