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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Newton, Andrew D.
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: H1, G1

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: health care economics and organizations
This paper examines two specific crime types, violence against the person and criminal damage that occur at activity nodes near alcohol supply points. These are defined as premises licensed to sell alcohol for on site and or off site consumption. A conjunctive analysis method is used (Meithe et al, 2008; Hart and Miethe, 2014) to examine the following question. What specific configurations of licensed premise types influence risk of these crime types (bar; nightclub; off license; supermarket; restaurant; takeaway/fast food; hotel; members club); what is the impact of density of premise and size of premises at these activity nodes on the above configurations; and what are the prevention implications of the findings. Truth tables reveal particular combinations of premise type and densities account for large proportion of crimes, and suggest targeting resources in these areas would be most beneficial for crime reduction. This advantage of this approach for examining the relationship between land use and crime, compared to regression analysis, is also highlighted.
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