LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Ousey, Karen; Cutting, Keith (2016)
Publisher: Mark Allen
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: RT

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: integumentary system
Winters seminal work in the 1960s relating to providing an optimal level of moisture to aid wound healing (granulation and re-epithelialisation) has been the single most effective advance in wound care over many decades. As such the development of advanced wound dressings that manage the fluidic wound environment have provided significant benefits in terms of healing to both patient and clinician. Although moist wound healing provides the guiding management principle confusion may arise between what is deemed to be an adequate level of tissue hydration and the risk of developing maceration. In addition, the counter-intuitive model ‘hyper-hydration’ of tissue appears to frustrate the moist wound healing approach and advocate a course of intervention whereby tissue is hydrated beyond what is a normally acceptable therapeutic level. This paper discusses tissue hydration, the cause and effect of maceration and distinguishes these from hyper-hydration of tissue. The rationale is to provide the clinician with a knowledge base that allows optimisation of treatment and outcomes and explains the reasoning behind wound healing using hyper-hydration.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • Experimental evidence  Clinical Evidence  Winter, 1962(5); Dyson, 1988(90)  Falanga, 1988(97); Beam et al., 2008(98);    Varghese et al., 1986(99); Rubio et al.,  Eaglstein 2001(17); Triller et al. 2012(91)  1991(100); Madden et al., 1989(101);    Wigger‐Alberti et al 2009(102)  Svensjö et al., 2000(14); Hacki et al., 2014(15); Powers  Jones et al., 2007(103)  et al., 2013(92)   
    • Romanelli et al 2004(104); Attinger et al., 
    •   2007(105): Harding, 2012(106)  Svensjö et al., 2000(14); Rusak et al., 2013(93)    Dyson, 1992(94); Mosti et al., 2013(21)    Chen et al., 1992(95) ; Leung et al., 2007(96)   
    • Korting et al., 2011(77) 
    • Field and Kerstein, 1994(107): Dowsett and 
    • Ayello, 2004(108):     Hutchinson & Lawrence, 1991(109); Kannon 
    • & Garret, 1995(110); Rovee & Maibach, 
    • 2003(111); NICE, 2008(112) 
    • Duleck et al., 2005(71); Hall, 2007(72); Tao 
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article