LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Bagneris, Claire; McCusker, Emily C.; Ulmschneider, J.P.; Wallace, Bonnie A. (2013)
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal: Biophysical Journal
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: bcs, Biophysics
Microsecond atomic detail equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations based on the open-state crystal structure (McCusker et al, 2012, Nature Comm) of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (NavMs) have been employed to characterize the mechanisms underlying ion selectivity and conductance of the channel embedded in a lipid bilayer membrane. This approach captured the full plethora of conduction events, revealing a complex mixture of single and multi-ion phenomena, with decoupled rapid bi-directional water transport. Channel selectivity for Na over K ions was found to increase with decreasing applied membrane potential. In marked difference to K-channel simulations, no voltage lag was observed for Na+. Unlike in K+ channels, the ions are fully hydrated at all times, even when bound. The ion positions were correlated with electron density in selectivity filter of the crystal structure. Remarkably, and in stark contrast to K-channels, ionic conduction was found to be independent of net water flux, which was zero for all applied voltages and ionic species. This zero water transport was found to result from the balance of two large and opposing water fluxes of equal magnitude.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article