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Bishop, Mark (J. M.) (2010)
Publisher: Emerald, UK
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: TheoryofComputation_GENERAL
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • [1] Whitby, B. (1996) The Turing Test: AI's Biggest Blind Alley? In: Millican, P. & Clark, A. (eds) (1996) Machines and Thought: The Legacy of Alan Turing. Mind Association Occasional Series 1, pp. 53-62. New York & Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    • [2] Colby, K.M., Hilf, F.D., Weber, S. & Kraemer, H.C. (1972) Turing-like indistinguishability tests for the validation of a computer simulation of paranoid processes, Arti cial Intelligence 3: 199{221
    • [3] Copeland, B.J. & Proudfoot, D. (2005) Turing and the Computer, in Copeland, B.J. (ed) (2005) Alan Turing's Automatic Computing Engine, Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press.
    • [4] Copeland, B.J. (2000), The Turing Test, Minds and Machines, 10: 519{39.
    • [5] Copeland, B.J. (ed) (2004) The Essential Turing. Oxford: Clarendon Press: 488.
    • [6] Genova, J. (1994) Turing's Sexual Guessing Game, Social Epistemology, 8: 313{26.
    • [7] Moor, J. (2001), The Status and Future of the Turing Test, Minds and Machines, 11: 77-93.
    • [8] Piccinini, G. (2000), Turing's Rules for the Imitation Game, Minds and Machines, 10: 573-85.
    • [9] Traiger, S. (2000) Making the Right Identi cation in the Turing Test, Minds and Machines, 10: 561-572.
    • [10] Turing, A.M. (1948) Intelligent Machinery. National Physical Laboratory Report, 1948, in Copeland, B.J. (ed) (2004) The Essential Turing, Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press.
    • [11] Turing, A.M. (1950) Computing Machinery and Intelligence, Mind 59, pp. 433{460.
    • [12] Turing, A.M., Braithwaite, R., Je erson, G. & Newman, M. (1952) Can Automatic Calculating Machines Be Said To Think? in Copeland, B.J. (ed) (2004) The Essential Turing. Oxford: Clarendon Press: 487{506.
    • [13] Preston, J. & Bishop, M. (eds) (2002) Views into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Arti cial Intelligence, Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press.
    • [14] Searle, J. (1981) Minds, Brains, and Programs, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 3: 417-57.
    • [15] Wiggins, G. (2007) Personal communication, Geraint Wiggins, Professor of Computational Creativity, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK. 10The AISB will host a second Turing symposia at their spring convention 2010 to continue discussion of this question http://www.cse.dmu.ac.uk/~aayesh/TuringTestRevisited/Welcome.html
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