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Al-Sultan, Abdulrahman A.; Evans, Benjamin A.; Aboulmagd, Elsayed; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A.; Bohol, Marie Fe F.; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N.; Opazo, Andres F.; Amyes, Sebastian G. B. (2015)
Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
Journal: Frontiers in Microbiology
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Saudi Arabia, PFGE, Acinetobacter baumannii, Microbiology, QR1-502, carbapenem resistance, OXA, Original Research, VIM

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: polycyclic compounds, biochemical phenomena, metabolism, and nutrition, bacterial infections and mycoses, bacteria
It has previously been shown that carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are frequently detected in Saudi Arabia. The present study aimed to identify the epidemiology and distribution of antibiotic resistance determinants in these bacteria. A total of 83 A. baumannii isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and screened by PCR for carbapenemase genes and insertion sequences. Antibiotic sensitivity to imipenem, meropenem, tigecycline, and colistin were determined. Eight different PFGE groups were identified, and were spread across multiple hospitals. Many of the PFGE groups contained isolates belonging to World-wide clone 2. Carbapenem resistance or intermediate resistance was detected in 69% of isolates. The bla VIM gene was detected in 94% of isolates, while bla OXA-23-like genes were detected in 58%. The data demonstrate the co-existence and wide distribution of a number of clones of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii carrying multiple carbapenem-resistance determinants within hospitals in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia.