LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Campbell, Elaine (2015)
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: M100, M200, M900
In clinical legal education (CLE) circles there is a deep-seated belief that all law school clinics must pursue a social justice agenda by helping the poor. Consequently, clinics which assist businesses who can afford to pay for legal services are often met with disapproval. This may account for the scarcity of publications, especially in the United Kingdom, which explore and reflect on business law clinics. Yet these clinics do exist, and they are growing in number and scope. Using the Business & Commercial firms at Northumbria University’s Student Law Office as a case study, this paper defends the right of business law clinics to be part of the CLE movement. First, it argues that business law clinics allow law students to pursue a diverse and relevant education. Secondly, it queries why these clinics cannot fulfil a (reconceptualised) social justice mission.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article