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Savigny, Heather (2014)
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Despite the considerable advances of the feminist movement across Western societies, in Universities women are less likely to be promoted, or paid as much as their male colleagues, or even get jobs in the first place. One way in which we can start to reflect on why this might be the case is through hearing the experiences of women academics themselves. Using feminist methodology, this article attempts to unpack and explore just some examples of\ud ‘cultural sexism’ which characterise the working lives of many women in British academia.This article uses qualitative methods to describe and make sense of just some of those experiences. In so doing, the argument is also made that the activity of academia is profoundly gendered and this explicit acknowledgement may contribute to our\ud understanding of the under-representation of women in senior positions.
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    • Raddon, A (2002) 'Mothers in the academy: positioned and positioning within discourses of the “successful” academic and the “good mother” Studies in Higher Education 27 (4) pp387- 403
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