LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Dawkins, Lynne; Turner, John J.D.; Roberts, Amanda D.L.; Soar, Kirstie (2013)
Publisher: Wiley
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Identifiers:doi:10.1111/add.12150
Aims to characterize e-cigarette use, users, and effects, in a sample of Electronic Cigarette Company (TECC) and Totally Wicked E-Liquid (TWEL) users. Design and Setting Online survey hosted at the University of East London with links from TECC/TWEL websites between September 2011 to May 2012. Measurements Online questionnaire. Participants 1347 respondents from 33 countries (72% European), mean age 43 years, 70% male, 96% Causacian, 44% educated to degree level or above. Findings 74% reported not smoking for at least a few weeks since using the e-cigarette and 70% reported reduced urge to smoke. 72% of participants used a ‘tank’ system, most commonly, the eGo-C (23%). Mean duration of use was 10 months. Only 1% reported exclusive use of non-nicotine (0mg) containing liquid. E-cigarettes were generally considered to: be satisfying to use; elicit few side effects; be healthier than smoking; improve cough/breathing; and be associated with low levels of craving. Among ex-smokers, ‘time to first vape’ was significantly longer than ‘time to first cigarette’ (t1104=11.16, P <0.001) suggesting a lower level of dependence to e-cigarettes. Ex-smokers reported significantly greater reduction in craving than current smokers (χ21 =133.66, P<0.0007) although few other differences emerged between these groups. Compared to males, females opted more for chocolate/sweet flavours (χ21 =16.16, P< 0.001) and liked the e-cigarette because it resembles a cigarette(χ23 = 42.65, P< 0.001). Conclusions E-cigarettes tend to be used for smoking cessation but for a longer duration than NRT and were generally regarded as efficacious. Future research should focus on possible long-term health risks, abuse liability and cessation efficacy.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article