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Attipa, C; Hicks, C A E; Barker, E N; Christodoulou, V; Neofytou, K; Mylonakis, M E; Siarkou, V I; Vingopoulou, E I; Soutter, F; Chochlakis, D; Psaroulaki, A; Papasouliotis, K; Tasker, S (2017)
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Insect Science, CTBP, canine tick-borne pathogens, /dk/atira/pure/researchoutput/pubmedpublicationtype/D016428, /dk/atira/pure/researchoutput/pubmedpublicationtype/D013485, Infectious Diseases, Anaplasma platys, Microbiology, Ehrlichia canis, Short Communication, VBD, vector-borne disease, Mycoplasma haemocanis, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Canine tick-borne pathogens, Babesia vogeli, qPCR, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Hepatozoon canis, Journal Article, Cyprus, Parasitology

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: parasitic diseases, geographic locations, humanities, bacterial infections and mycoses, virus diseases
Canine tick-borne pathogens such as Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis are widespread in the Mediterranean basin but have never been reported or investigated in Cyprus. We describe herein the presence of canine tick-borne pathogens in three dogs with clinical signs compatible with vector-borne diseases from Paphos area of Cyprus. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of E. canis, Anaplasma platys, H. canis, Babesia vogeli and Mycoplasma haemocanis in Cyprus. One dog co-infected with E. canis, H. canis, B. vogeli and M. haemocanis is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of this multiple co-infection in dogs. The tick-borne pathogens reported in the current study should be considered in the differential diagnoses in dogs exposed to ticks in Cyprus.

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