LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Bray, J.
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
This article examines how two female writers of the early nineteenth century, Amelia Opie and Jane Austen, employ the language of portraiture in their fiction to illustrate the difficulties inherent in the assessment of character, especially for the female heroine. The representation of actual portraits in their work is discussed, along with the use of language associated with the form. Both writers, it is suggested, are aware of important changes within the theory and practice of portraiture in the period, and explore these in their fiction to draw attention to the instability and subjectivity of interpretation.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • xviii A Memoir by Mrs Opie 1809, 42-3, 17-18.
    • xix Amelia Opie, Adeline Mowbray, or The Mother and Daughter: A Tale (London: Printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, & Orme, Paternoster Row and A. Constable and Co. Edinburgh, 1805), II, 169.
    • xx Amelia Opie, Temper, or Domestic Scenes: A Tale (London: Printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster Row, 1813), I, 145-6.
    • xxi Brilliant 1991, 8, 31.
    • xxii Brilliant 1987, 171-2.
    • xxiii Jane Austen, Emma, edited by Fiona Stafford (London: Penguin, 1996 [1816]), 38.
    • xxiv Pointon 1993, 9.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article