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Woodcock, JS; Peris, E; Sica, G; Koziel, Z; Moorhouse, AT; Waddington, DC
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: built_and_human_env, health_and_wellbeing
This paper presents results from a large scale study investigating the human response to vibration in residential environments. The main aim of this study was to derive exposure-response relationships for annoyance caused by vibration experienced within residential properties from sources outside of residents‘ control. The study took the form of a questionnaire administered to UK residents in their own homes to determine self reported annoyance caused by vibration from a variety of sources along with measurements of vibration inside and outside residences to determine vibration exposure. In total, 1,431 case studies were conducted encompassing railway, construction, and internal vibration sources. Presented in this paper are the results of analyses which were conducted to determine the most appropriate descriptor for vibration exposure in residential environments for the dataset generated by this project. The main considerations for these analyses were the type of averaging used and frequency weighting. Following this, exposure-response relationships are presented for different vibration sources. The relationships take the form of curves indicating the percentage of people expressing annoyance above a given threshold for a given vibration exposure. Combined effects of vibration and noise exposure are also considered. [Work funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) UK].

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