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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Brewe, Kristin
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: Education, comms_and_culture

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION
Advertising, like many other media/communications disciplines, both creates and reinforces societal narratives relating to race, ethnicity, gender identity, disability, and sexual orientation. When teaching undergraduate students advertising, encouraging them to craft communications that embrace our diverse society is a central teaching goal for both ethical and practical reasons. \ud \ud How can an educator encourage diverse students to pursue the profession? How can instructors effectively expand student awareness of their professional responsibility in shaping communications?\ud \ud This presentation shows the results from a student-driven workshop where students themselves explored the concepts of stereotypes in image selection for advertising communications. Engaging students as partners in learning overcame a classroom hierarchy that may itself be an obstacle to internalising diversity. \ud \ud As pre- and post-activity survey data shows, peer-to-peer discussion during the workshop seems to have increased awareness of the importance of diversity and overall classroom engagement.
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