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Ho, Ngoc Anh Thu; Dawes, Stephanie S.; Crowe, Adam M.; Casabon, Israël; Gao, Chen; Kendall, Sharon L.; Baker, Edward N.; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Lott, J. Shaun (2016)
Publisher: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Protein Structure and Folding
Cholesterol can be a major carbon source for Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection, both at an early stage in the macrophage phagosome and later within the necrotic granuloma. KstR is a highly conserved TetR family transcriptional repressor that regulates a large set of genes responsible for cholesterol catabolism. Many genes in this regulon, including kstR, are either induced during infection or are essential for survival of M. tuberculosis in vivo. In this study, we identified two ligands for KstR, both of which are CoA thioester cholesterol metabolites with four intact steroid rings. A metabolite in which one of the rings was cleaved was not a ligand. We confirmed the ligand-protein interactions using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and showed that ligand binding strongly inhibited KstR-DNA binding using surface plasmon resonance (IC50 for ligand = 25 nm). Crystal structures of the ligand-free form of KstR show variability in the position of the DNA-binding domain. In contrast, structures of KstR·ligand complexes are highly similar to each other and demonstrate a position of the DNA-binding domain that is unfavorable for DNA binding. Comparison of ligand-bound and ligand-free structures identifies residues involved in ligand specificity and reveals a distinctive mechanism by which the ligand-induced conformational change mediates DNA release.

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