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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Jones, Helen M.F. (2014)
Publisher: The Thoresby Society
Languages: English
Types: Part of book or chapter of book
Subjects: DA
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 6. A. Percival, Youth will be Led: the Story of the VoluntaryYouth Organisations (1951), p. 59.
    • 7. Ibid.
    • 8. LAGC, Twelfth Annual Report, Nov. 1916.
    • 9. Hopkins.
    • 10. Birmingham Daily Post, 11 Sept. 1894. Miss Cheetham, the worker, worked at Mansfield House Women's Settlement Girls' Club.
    • 11. Percival, p. 60.
    • 12. S. Mitchell, The New Girl (New York, 1995), p. 38.
    • 13. S.Todd, Young Women,Work, and Family in England 1918-50 (Oxford, 2005), p. 134.
    • 14. Mitchell, p. 38.
    • 15. Birmingham Daily Post, 11 Sept. 1894.
    • 16. A. Davies, The Gangs of Manchester (Preston, 2008), p. 290. In March 1890 Sarah Ann Hickson preferred a month in Strangeways with hard labour to service in a 'respectable home'. Later the same year, Alice Cullen made the same choice when faced with service or a fine for being drunk and disorderly.
    • 17. LAGC, Tenth Annual Report, Nov. 1914.
    • 18. K. Gleadle, British Women in the Nineteenth Century (Basingstoke, 2001), p. 63. She observes,'Many women developed their philanthropic activities to such a degree that we may regard them as having a quasi-professional status' although types of work were subject to trends.
    • 19. See, for example, Pamela,'Moderna on Matters Feminine', The County Gentleman: Sporting Gazette,Agricultural Journal, 26 May, 1900.
    • 20. M. Stanley, Clubs for Working Girls (1890), p. 21.
    • 21. F. L. Freeman, Our Working-Girls and How to Help Them (1908), p. 42.
    • 22. B. Harrison,'For Church, Queen and Family:The Girls' Friendly Society 1874-1920,' Past and Present, 61:1 (1973), p. 116.
    • 23. H. M.F. Jones,'Darning, Doylies and Dancing: the work of the Leeds Association of Girls' Clubs (1904-1913) 20 (3), Women's History Review (2011), 369-88.
    • 24. Born into the Plymouth Brethren, Charles became a Roman Catholic priest when a young man. He was in his 30s when he married a teenager and joined the Unitarians. He became a major figure in the cultural life of Leeds in the early twentieth century and was president of the Thoresby Society from 1913-1915. His life is recounted by L. P. Jacks, From Authority to Freedom (1920).
    • 25. Leeds and District Association of Girls' Clubs, Twenty-Seventh Annual Report, Nov. 1931.
    • 26. LAGC, Minute Book.
    • 27. Anna's work with the Women's Christian Temperance Union included promoting total abstinence among women and girls and visiting police cells on Sundays. See A. G. Burdett-Coutts, ed., Women's Mission (1893), p. 396.
    • 28. At least four members of the family including the duchess's great grandmother were involved in girls' clubs in Leeds. Like the Hargroves, they were Unitarians: LAGC reflected Leeds itself in its non-conformism.
    • 29. See, for example,W. Reason,'Settlements and Recreations' in University and Social Settlements ed. by W. Reason (1898), p. 85 and E. J. Urwick,'Conclusion' in Studies of Boy Life in Our Cities, ed. by E. J. Urwick (1904), p. 306.
    • 30. M(anchester) W(eekly) T(imes), 28 Apr. 1888.
    • 31. In Manchester, 75 per cent were rejected according to A. Davies, p. 347.
    • 32. Holloway, p. 12.
    • 33. MWT, 3 Nov. 1888.
    • 34. The Times, 22 Oct. 1907.
    • 35. B. Davies,'From Voluntaryism to Welfare State: A History of the Youth Service', England Volume 1 1939-1979 (Leicester, 1999), p. 26.
    • 36. Freeman, p. 12. Flora Freeman worked with girls in London and Brighton.
    • 37. LAGC, Minute Book.
    • 38. LDAGC, Twelfth Annual Report, Nov. 1916.
    • 39. LDAGC, Eighteenth Annual Report, Nov. 1922.
    • 40. LDAGC, Nineteenth Annual Report, Nov. 1923.
    • 41. LDAGC, Seventeenth Annual Report, Nov. 1921.
    • 42. LDAGC, Twenty-Fourth Annual Report, Nov. 1928.
    • 43. C. Oldfield,'“The worst girl has at least 5 per cent good in her”:The work of the Girl Guides and the YMCA with “difficult girls” during the inter-war period' in Essays in the History of Community andYouth Work, ed. by R. Gilchrist,T. Jeffs and J. Spence, (Leicester, 2001), pp. 135-47.The Girl Guides were established formally in 1910.
    • 44. LDAGC, Twenty-Third Annual Report, Nov. 1927.
    • 45. 'Housing Estates Mean Loneliness for Girls', N(ews) C(hronicle), 29 Jan. 1937;'Lonely Girls on New Estates', Yorkshire Post, 30 Jan. 1937.
    • 46. NC, 29 Jan. 1937.
    • 56. E. Pethick,'Working Girls' Clubs' in University and Social Settlements, ed. by W. Reason (1898), p. 105.
    • 57. J. Spence,'Working for Jewish Girls: Lily Montagu, girls' clubs and industrial reform 1890-1914,' Women's History Review. 13(3) (2004).
    • 58. For example, the Association of Working Girls' Clubs for Bristol and District's objects included,'To circulate information about (a) Homes and other institutions helpful to girls; (b) Poor-law, Factory Acts and condition of women's labour' see A.M. Beddoe, 'Paragraphs', The Englishwoman's Review, 15 Jan. 1897.
    • 59. LAGC, Minute Book.
    • 60. See J. Liddington, Rebel Girls (2006), p. 207.
    • 61. LAGC, Minute Book.
    • 70. LDAGC, Twelfth Annual Report, Nov. 1916.
    • 71. LDAGC, Tenth Annual Report, Nov. 1914.
    • 72. LDAGC, Twelfth Annual Report, Nov. 1916.
    • 73. B. Caine, English Feminism 1780-1980 (Oxford, 1997), p. 180.
    • 74. W. H. Scott, Leeds in the Great War (Leeds, 1923), p. 70.
    • 75. Holloway, p. 147.
    • 76. J. Stead,'Changing the Pattern: Everyday Life 1800-1900,' in Huddersfield - A Most Handsome Town, ed. by E.A. Hilary Haigh (Huddersfield, 1992), p. 639.
    • 77. E. C. Gregory,'A Club Holiday,' The Monthly Packet, 1 Sept.1895.
    • 78. E. J. Urwick,'Conclusion,' in Studies of Boy Life in Our Cities, ed. by E.J. Urwick (1904), p. 303.
    • 79. Freeman, p. 135.The Offences Against the Person Act 1861 made the deliberate procuring of miscarriage illegal.
    • 80. Todd, p. 155. She quotes Mary Welch who was a leather worker.
    • 81. Pethick, p. 239.
    • 82. L. Montagu,'The Girl in the Background' in Studies of Boy Life in Our Cities ed. by E. J. Urwick (1904), p. 239.
    • 83. Ibid, p. 251.
    • 84. LDAGC, Seventeenth Annual Report, Nov. 1921. St Dunstan's is now known as Blind Veterans U.K.
    • 85. LDAGC, Twenty-Fifth Annual Report, Nov. 1929.
    • 91. LDAGC, Nineteenth Annual Report, Nov. 1923.
    • 92. House of Commons, A Century of Change:Trends in the UK since 1900. Statistics Research Paper 99/111, (21 Dec. 1999).
    • 93. LDAGC, Twenty-Sixth Annual Report, Nov. 1930.
    • 94. LDAGC, Minute Book.
    • 95. LDAGC, Minutes of 32nd AGM, 1936.
    • 96. Ibid.
    • 102. Yorkshire Association of Girls' Clubs, Minutes of Executive Committee Meeting, 3 Jan. 1941.
    • 103. LAGC, Minutes of Executive Committee Meeting, 21 Mar. 1941.
    • 104. B. Davies, p. 15.
    • 105. Ibid, p. 17.
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