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Schnettler, B.; Adasme-Berríos , C.; Grunert , K.G.; Márquez , M.P.; Lobos , G.; Salinas-Oñate, N.; Orellana, L.; Sepúlveda , J. (2016)
Publisher: Emerald
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Purpose – To assess the effect of attitudes towards functional foods (FF) on university students’ satisfaction with food-related life and to distinguish student typologies, considering that the attitudes towards FF are not homogeneous among consumers. Design/methodology - A survey was applied to 372 university students (mean age=20.4 years, SD=2.4) in southern Chile. The questionnaire included the Attitudes towards Functional Foods (AFF) questionnaire and the Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFL) scale, questions about consumption and knowledge about FF and socio-demographic characteristics. Findings – Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) and Structural Equation Modelling, it was found that attitudes toward functional foods directly and significantly influence students’ satisfaction with food-related life. A cluster analysis applied to the Z-scores from the factors obtained by the CFA classified three typologies: Positive towards FF (36.3%), moderately positive towards FF (43.0%) and negative towards FF (20.7%). The positive towards FF type had a significantly greater SWFL score than the negative towards FF type. The types differ according to consumption and knowledge about FF. Research limitations/implications – This study was conducted in the context of only one country in South America. Originality/value – This study is the first that assesses the effect of AFF on satisfaction with food-related life in a sample of university students. Fostering positive attitudes towards FF will allow for a growth in the degree of satisfaction with food-related life of university students with features similar to those of the study sample.

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