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Goodwin, Rachel Ann (2016)
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects:
Objectives: Memory problems are reported in 40-60% of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), they can affect independence in activities of daily living and may limit their ability to benefit from rehabilitation. There was some evidence to support the use of NeuroPage, a memory aid service, in people with neurological conditions, but there were methodological limitations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the NeuroPage service for people with MS who have memory problems.\ud \ud Systematic Review: A systematic review on external memory aids for people with MS was performed. Eight studies were included; one study reported a treatment effect on subjective memory functioning; one on mood. No effect was demonstrated on objective memory functioning or quality of life. It was concluded that the evidence was insufficient, and high quality trials were needed.\ud \ud Methods: A multicentre, single-blind randomised controlled crossover trial design was employed. People with MS and self-reported memory problems were recruited into the trial, following referral from MS services. The intervention was ‘NeuroText’, a service that sends reminder messages to people’s mobile phones at pre-arranged times via the existing NeuroPage system. In the control condition participants received non-memory texts, containing items of interest, such as news headlines. Outcome measures were completed using postal questionnaires. t-tests were employed to compare intervention and control conditions. Semi-structured feedback interviews were performed with 25 participants.\ud \ud Results: Of the 106 people referred 38 took part. They were aged 28 to 72 (mean=48, S.D.=11) and 10 were men. No significant differences between NeuroText and control were detected on the Everyday Memory Questionnaire (t =0.84, p=0.41). The number of daily diary items forgotten in the NeuroText condition was significantly less than in the control (9% vs. 31%; t=-2.8, p=0.01). Reported psychological distress in the NeuroText condition was also less than control (t=-3.83, p=0.001). Seven themes were identified from participant feedback.\ud \ud Conclusions: NeuroText appears to be help people with MS to achieve their everyday tasks and improve mood, however these improvements were not reflected on the questionnaire measure of the frequency of memory problems in everyday life.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 2   Systematic   Review:   External   memory   aids   for   memory   problems   in   people  
    • with  multiple  sclerosis  ........................................................................................  21   2.1   Abstract . ............................................................................................................ 2 1   2.1.1   Background . ...................................................................................................... 2 1   Qualitative  Results  ...................................................................................... 1 17  
    • 5.1   Chapter  Summary. ...........................................................................................  117  
    • 5.2   Feedback  interviews .  .......................................................................................  117  
    • 5.2   Reminder  messages.  ........................................................................................  119   5.2.1   Perceived  usefulness  of  NeuroText. ...............................................................  119   5.2.1.1   Memory-­‐related  improvements . .........................................................................  119   5.2.1.2   Improved  ability  to  manage  mood  ......................................................................  123   5.2.1.3   Improved  fatigue  management . ..........................................................................  126   5.2.2   NeuroText  ending  ..........................................................................................  127   5.2.2.1   Benefit  remained . ................................................................................................  127   5.2.2.2   Stopped  achieving  target  behaviours . .................................................................  129   5.2.2.3   Concerns . .............................................................................................................  129  
    • Participant' 1
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