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Smeeton, NJ; Page, J; Causer, J; Wilson, M; Gray, R; Williams, AM
Publisher: British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: RC1200

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: genetic structures, eye diseases, human activities
Two types of vision training programmes exist, namely, generalised vision training (GVT) and sport-specific vision training (SVT). GVT programmes are designed to improve basic visual function (e.g., depth perception, motion perception and peripheral vision). A range of exercises is typically used by vision specialists such as optometrists and ophthalmologists. Although these specialists usually work to assist individuals with visual deficiencies, more recently the same methods have been used with athletes in an effort to improve sports performance. Whilst there is anecdotal support for the use of GVT programmes, there remains a paucity of empirical evidence to suggest that such training improves sports performance. Conversely, research on SVT has been shown to lead to task-specific improvements in sports performance (Smeeton et al., 2005; Williams et al., 2002). Here, we summarise scientific research that examines the utility of both types of training programmes for performance enhancement in sport.
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