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Zeh, Peter; Sandhu, Harbinder; Cannaby, A. M.; Warwick, Jane; Sturt, Jackie (2016)
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: RC, HT
Identifiers:doi:10.1111/dme.13000
Aims: To determine the cultural competence of diabetes services delivered to ethnic minority populations in a multicultural UK city with 4.3% diabetes prevalence. Methods: A semi-structured survey comprising 35 questions, was carried out across all 66 General Practices in Coventry between November 2011 and January 2012. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. The cultural competence of diabetes services reported in the survey was assessed using the Culturally-Competent Assessment Tool (CCAT). Results: Thirty-four practices (52%) responded. Six important findings emerged across the practices that responded: (1) 94% of general practices reported the ethnicity of their populations. (2) One in three people with diabetes was from an ethnic minority group. (3) Nine (26.5%) practices reported between 55%-96% diabetes prevalence in ethnic minority groups. (4) Cultural competence of diabetes services were assessed using CCAT; 56% of practices were found to be highly culturally-competent and 26% moderately culturally-competent. (5) Ten practices (29%) reported higher proportionate attendance of diabetes annual checks in the majority white British population compared to ethnic minority groups. (6) Cultural diversity in relation to language and strong cultural traditions around food were most commonly reported as barriers to culturally-competent service delivery. Conclusions: Seven of the eight cultural barriers identified in the global evidence were present in the city. Use of the CCAT to assess existing service provision and the good baseline recording of ethnicity provide a sound basis for commissioning culturally-competent interventions in the future.

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