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Cammack, Paul J.; Convery, Ian; Prince, Heather (2011)
Publisher: Wiley
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Z820, Z69, Z609

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: food and beverages, technology, industry, and agriculture, geographic locations, social sciences
Private, domestic gardens are important both as sites for leisure and as sites of conservation interest. Birdwatching is an important leisure activity, yet there appear to be no previous studies that combine these two themes of importance to the understanding of managed garden spaces. Semi-structured interviews were held with birdwatchers as part of a larger study of the interactions between local places and birdwatching. Respondents revealed a wide and disparate spectrum of responses to their gardens and to how they made use of their gardens in their normal birdwatching activities. The study raises questions about the extent to which gardens are viewed as sites for interactions with nature and raises challenges about the use of gardens as areas of conservation action.
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    • Alexander, C 2002 The Garden as Occasional Domestic Space, Signs 21, 857-871 Anderson, K 1997 A Walk on the wild side: a critical geography of domestication, Progress in Human Geography 21, 463-485
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    • Bargheer, S 2008 Towards a Leisure Theory of Value: The Game of Bird-watching and the Concern for Conservation in Great Britain, Paper presented at Inter-Ivy Sociology Symposium 2008, Princeton University
    • http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/soctheory/Stefan.doc Accessed 8/7/08
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    • ----- 2000 “I Never Promised You a Rose Garden”: Gender, Leisure and Home-Making, Leisure Studies 19, 183-199
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    • Clout, M N, Elliott, G P and Robertson, B C 2002 Effects of supplementary feeding on the offspring sex ratio of kakapo: a dilemma for the conservation of a polygynous parrot Biological Conservation 107, 13-18
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