LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Steenbrugge, C. (2012)
Publisher: Brepols Publishers
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Presenter figures in medieval drama are often assumed to represent ecclesiastical authority and to ensure a straightforward transfer of orthodox devotion from stage to audience. The various presenters in the medieval English N-Town compilation (Contemplacio in the Mary Play, Primus Doctor and Secundus Doctor in the ‘Procession of Saints’, Contemplacio in Passion Play II, and Doctor in the Assumption Play) challenge these assumptions and demonstrate that East Anglian playwrights encouraged a critical audience and were as, if not more, interested in the spectators’ enjoyment of the performance as the didactic content. The apparent lack of anxiety about divergent interpretations of the plays indicates not simply faith in the spectators’ abilities in that regard, it also seems to point to a relatively open-minded and lax attitude to certain religious differences in fifteenth-century East Anglia.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article