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Francis, Leslie J. (2013)
Publisher: Chengchi University
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: BF, BV, BL
Since the pioneering work of William James at the dawn of the twentieth century, \ud psychologists have been interested in the study of mysticism, with the consequence that \ud mysticism is now the aspect of religious experience most adequately and most \ud comprehensively discussed within the psychology of religion. The aims of this paper are \ud threefold. First, attention is given to the detailed international research literature on the \ud psychology of the three constructs identified as mystical orientation, mystical experience, and \ud mysticism. Emphasis is placed 1) on the conceptualisation of Stace and the operationalisation \ud afforded by the Hood Mysticism Scale, and 2) on the conceptualisation of Happold and the \ud operationalisation afforded by the Francis-Louden Mystical Orientation Scale. Second, the \ud new data concerning mysticism from the Religious Experience in Contemporary Taiwan\ud survey are employed to construct the Index of Mystical Experience in Taiwan (IMET). Third, \ud this new instrument is employed to examine the connections between mystical experience \ud and individual differences of sex, age, education, religious identity and religious belief.
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