LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Roberts, Beverly A.; Deary, Ian J.; Dykiert, Dominika; Der, Geoffrey; Batty, G. David (2014)
Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Research Article, Biology and Life Sciences, Cognitive Psychology, Research Design, Neuroscience, Research and Analysis Methods, Clinical Research Design, Psychometrics, Lifecourse Epidemiology, Medicine, Cancer Risk Factors, Epidemiology of Aging, Oncology, Epidemiology, Q, R, Psychology, Cancer Epidemiology, Social Sciences, Science, Survey Methods, Medicine and Health Sciences, Survey Research, Cognitive Science
Objectives

\ud \ud To investigate the association of reaction time with cancer incidence.

\ud \ud Methods

\ud \ud 6900 individuals aged 18 to 94 years who participated in the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey in 1984/1985 and were followed for a cancer registration for 25 years.

\ud \ud Results

\ud \ud Disease surveillance gave rise to 1015 cancer events from all sites. In general, there was essentially no clear pattern of association for either simple or choice reaction time with cancer of all sites combined, nor specific malignancies. However, selected associations were found for lung cancer, colorectal cancer and skin cancer.

\ud \ud Conclusions

\ud \ud In the present study, reaction time and its components were not generally related to cancer risk.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article