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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Smith, Laura
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects: RC0475, RC512
Section A: A review of literature focused on African Caribbean men with diagnoses of both conduct disorder (as an indicator of antisocial behaviour) and severe mental illness. The review concludes that disorganised infant attachments appear to be predictive of conduct disorder, psychosis and poor engagement with services in a reciprocal 'vicious circle'.\ud Section B: Empirical Paper: This study examined the relationships of African Caribbean men with severe mental illness and a history of conduct disorder, linking this to engagement with services. This was explored qualitatively using attachment theory and Lacanian discourse analysis within a psychosocial methodology. Four interviews were conducted and the texts were analysed. The findings echo the evidence base in showing that, according to this interpretation, all participants showed signs of disorganised attachment. All had had adverse encounters within mental health services although all could also cite discrete experiences which had been helpful and supportive. Each participant held different views about the interaction of ethnicity with care. \ud Section C: A critical reflection on the research process, including: thoughts on learning experiences; retrospective changes to the study; clinical implications; and ideas for future research.

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