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Lindsay, Richard; Birnie, Richard; Clough, Jack (2014)
Publisher: International Union for the Conservation of Nature
Languages: English
Types: Book
Subjects:
Bog vegetation is sensitive to trampling and thus is only able to sustain a combination of domestic and wild grazing stock at very low densities. Higher densities combine with impacts such as burning, drainage and atmospheric pollution to cause loss of the protective bog vegetation and development of erosion complexes. Trampling is also an issue for researchers repeatedly visiting monitoring locations, even if only once a year.\ud \ud This briefing note is part of a series aimed at policy makers, practitioners and academics to help explain the ecological processes that underpin peatland function. Understanding the ecology of peatlands is essential when investigating the impacts of human activity on peatlands, interpreting research findings and planning the recovery of damaged peatlands.
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