LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Malwah, Monique N.
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects: BF77, HM1001, RA790
The aim of this grounded theory study was to explore the social identity of members of service user groups that train mental health professionals (SUG-TR). Additionally, the study aimed to construct an explanatory model of how participating in such groups contributes towards the achievement and maintenance of positive social identity. \ud Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight members of SUG-TR. Grounded theory was used to build a preliminary model, which contained 5 main categories: ‘Impact of mental illness/ impact of receiving a psychiatric diagnosis’; ‘The experience of stigma’; ‘Participating in SUG-TR’; ‘Contributing to positive identity’; and ‘Challenges to participating’. \ud The constructed theory suggests that participation in such groups can contribute towards the achievement and maintenance of a positive social identity and that participants adopted specific strategies to achieve positive distinctiveness (i.e. an individual striving for positive self-concept) in the SUG-TR meetings and training environments.\ud The constructed theory extends current research and suggests that SUG-TRs provide unique opportunities for the development of socially valued roles. The limitations and clinical implications of the research are explored and suggestions for further research are presented.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Funded by projects

  • WT

Cite this article