LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Odena, O. (2001)
Languages: English
Types: Other
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION
This paper explores secondary school music teachers' views of creativity and some of their ideas about teaching composing skills. In order to do this, firstly an initial explanation of past and present controversies surrounding the meaning of the term creativity is given. The centralised production of music curricula during the 1990s has unified the knowledge pupils are expected to ‘attain’. However, issues concerning creativity, its meanings and their interpretation remain because they have not been resolved by centralised policy production. Secondly, different approaches taken by several studies on creativity are reviewed and a four-fold framework for researching music teachers' views of creativity is suggested (i.e. Pupil - Environment - Process - Product). Finally, preliminary results of an enquiry carried out in England with six teachers are presented for consideration. A qualitative research design was used to allow teachers to reflect on their ideas. Selected videotaped extracts of their own lessons on composition and improvisation where used for the purpose of discussion with participants during later interviews. The process of analysis was assisted by a software package for qualitative research (i.e. NUDIST). The conclusions drawn from the interviews indicated to some new categories and subcategories that supported the initial framework. The focus in this paper is on the teachers' definitions of creativity, their role in teaching composing skills and the positive influence of teaching in developing their own creativity. The teachers' comments revealed some of the complexities embraced within the concept of creativity and its use in music education.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Download from

Cite this article