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Dietz, Sarah N.; Aulerich, Nicole M.; Irwin, Scott H.; Good, Darrel L. (2009)
Types: Article
Subjects: benchmarks, Illinois, Kansas, marketing, performance, price, wheat, Agribusiness, Crop Production/Industries, Marketing, Production Economics, Productivity Analysis, Q11, Q13,, benchmarks, Illinois, Kansas, marketing, performance, price, wheat, Agricultural Finance,

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: ComputingMilieux_THECOMPUTINGPROFESSION
The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the average difference between farmer and market benchmark prices are sensitive to the market benchmark considered. Marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas is about equal to the market if 24- or 20-month market benchmarks are used, is slightly above the market if a 12-month price benchmark is used, and is significantly less than the market if the harvest benchmark is used. The sensitivity of marketing performance to the market benchmark considered is explained by the seasonal pattern of prices. While Illinois producers performed slightly better than their counterparts in Kansas, notable differences in performance across these two geographic areas is not observed.
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