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Bennis, H.J. (2005)
Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects: small clauses, expletive pronouns, dummy pronouns, thematic roles, lege categorieen, Uitgebreid Projectie Principe, subjectless sentences, Government Binding theorie, dummy pronomina, Extended Projection Principle, government, Naamvalstheorie, gap conditie, inversion, unaccusative verbs, het, inversie, connectedness, Dutch and Flemish language, parasitaire gaten, thematische rollen, subjectloze zinnen, CF, onaccusatieve werkwoorden, Case theory, expletieve pronomina, er, R-pronomina, psychologische werkwoorden, preposition stranding, syntaxis, R-pronouns, voorzetsel stranding, Nederlandse taal, syntax, empty categories, gap condition, Government Binding theory, psychological verbs, parasitic gaps
In this study the syntactic properties of empty categories and dummy pronouns are investigated within the framework of Government-Binding theory. The assumption that clauses must have a subject is present in most, if not all, linguistic theories. In GB theory the requirement that clauses have a subject is stipulated as a consequence of the base rules or the Extended Projection Principle. In this book it is claimed that no such stipulation is necessary. The presence of a subject is exclusively determined by the theories of thematic roles and Case. This view is supported by the fact that the alleged dummy subjects Dutch, i.e. er and het, show a variety of properties, which can only be explained if they are not analyzed as dummy subjects. Further confirmation is derived from the fact that Dutch, subjectless sentences are found in precisely those circumstances in which neither -theory nor Case theory requires a subject to be present. Chapter 1 presents a theory of empty categories. This theory enables us to explain the distribution of gaps, and makes precise and correct predictions with respect to the occurrence of parasitic gaps. The non-dummy status of het, discussed in chapter 2, is supported by the fact that it can be the antecedent of PRO, reflexives, and parasitic gaps, and by an asymmetry in wh-movement from sentential complements. The analysis of het leads to a discussion of a variety of constructions, including constructions with raising, ergative, and psychological verbs. The adverbial pronoun er displays several distinct syntactic functions. In chapter 3 it is argued that none of these different functions justifies an analysis of er as a dummy subject. In chapter 4 some of the consequences of the theory introduced in the preceding chapters are investigated. These include a discussion of the status of the subject position in languages such as English, Italian, French, and Spanish, the structure of Old English, and the status of dummy pronouns in German and English. In this study the syntactic properties of empty categories and dummy pronouns are investigated within the framework of Government-Binding theory. The assumption that clauses must have a subject is present in most, if not all, linguistic theories. In GB theory the requirement that clauses have a subject is stipulated as a consequence of the base rules or the Extended Projection Principle. In this book it is claimed that no such stipulation is necessary. The presence of a subject is exclusively determined by the theories of thematic roles and Case. This view is supported by the fact that the alleged dummy subjects Dutch, i.e. er and het, show a variety of properties, which can only be explained if they are not analyzed as dummy subjects. Further confirmation is derived from the fact that Dutch, subjectless sentences are found in precisely those circumstances in which neither -theory nor Case theory requires a subject to be present. Chapter 1 presents a theory of empty categories. This theory enables us to explain the distribution of gaps, and makes precise and correct predictions with respect to the occurrence of parasitic gaps. The non-dummy status of het, discussed in chapter 2, is supported by the fact that it can be the antecedent of PRO, reflexives, and parasitic gaps, and by an asymmetry in wh-movement from sentential complements. The analysis of het leads to a discussion of a variety of constructions, including constructions with raising, ergative, and psychological verbs. The adverbial pronoun er displays several distinct syntactic functions. In chapter 3 it is argued that none of these different functions justifies an analysis of er as a dummy subject. In chapter 4 some of the consequences of the theory introduced in the preceding chapters are investigated. These include a discussion of the status of the subject position in languages such as English, Italian, French, and Spanish, the structure of Old English, and the status of dummy pronouns in German and English.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 1. Gaps and Parasitic Gaps 7 1.1 Introduction 7 1.2 Connectedness 8 1.2.1 Kayne's g-projection 8 1.2.2 Two modifications of Kayne's g-projection 11 1 .2.3 Extraction from complement clauses 15 1.3 Complex cases of PPs 18 1 .3.1 Van Riemsdijk's analysis of P-stranding 19 1.3.2 Adjacency and P-stranding 21 1 .3.3 Extraction from complex PPs 25 1. 3.4 Reanalysis in complex PPs 29 1.4 Parasitic gaps 39 1.5 Parasitic gaps in Dutch 44 1 .5. 1 The distribution of parasitic gaps 44 1.5.2 Parasitic gaps without real gaps 54 1.6 Chains and features 71 1.7 An alternative approach to parasitic gaps in Dutch 79 1. 7.1 The analysis of Huybregts and Van Riemsdijk 1. 7 . 2 An argument against our analysis "82 1 .7.3 Parallelism between across-the-board and 83 parasitic-gap constructions Notes 88
    • 2. Het as a referential expression 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Weather-het 2.3 Referential properties of the dummy pronoun het 2.4 Het and sentential complements 2.4.1 Het in object position
    • 9. This assumption is adopted in most recent analyses of DE, see e.g. Lightfoot
    • (1979,1981), Fischer & Van der Leek (1983), Van Kemenade (1984a).
    • King Alfred's Old English Version of Boethius (8), ed. W.Sedgefield, 1899
    • ----rpt. Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, Darrnstadt, 1968.
    • ~ Alfred's Orosius (0), ed.H.Sweet, EETS 79, N.Trubner, London, 1883.
    • ----ed.H.Sweet, EETS 45 & 50, N.Trubner, London, 1871-1~
    • --- (Bede), ed. T.MiITer, EETS 95 & 96, N.Trubner, London-T890-1891.------
    • --- EETS 58,63 & 73, N.Trubner, Oxford 1880.
    • An Old English ~~rtyrology (Mart.), ed. J.Herzfield, EETS 116
    • -- ~gan Paul, Trench, Trubner, and Co., London 1900.
    • 'Gospel of St.Matthew', in: The West-Saxon Gospels (St.Mat.) ed. M.Grunberg, Scheltema-& Holkema, Amsterdam 1967.
    • voorwerk Bennis 2 AAA 14-10-2005 15:03 Pagina vii
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