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Jiang, Li; Li, Hengde (2016)
Publisher: Genetics Society of America
Journal: G3: Genes|Genomes|Genetics
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: QH426-470, half-smooth tongue sole, Genetics, sex reversal, genome-wide association study, Investigations, FBXL17
Sex determination is a fundamental biological process for individual sex development and population sex ratios. However, for some species, the primary sex might be altered during development, and individuals can develop into the opposite sex. Sex reversal may happen in insects, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes. In half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis), some genetically female fish irreversibly reverse to pseudomales, resulting in higher costs in aquaculture owing to a lower growth rate of male fish during a 2-yr growth period. Here, we identified a locus with large controlling effect on sex reversal in the half-smooth tongue sole through genome-wide association study with high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This SNP is located at the third intron of the F-box and leucine rich repeat protein 17 (FBXL17) gene on the Z chromosome, and it has two alleles, A and T. Genetic females with ZAW genotypes will never reverse into phenotypic males, but those with ZTW genotypes can sometimes undergo sex reversal. This SNP explains 82.7% of the genetic variation, or 58.4% of the phenotypic variation. Based on our results, a reproductive management program could be developed to improve the phenotypic female ratio in aquaculture, and elucidate the mechanism of sex reversal in half-smooth tongue sole. We expect that these findings will have a substantial impact on the population management in many harvested species where sex reversal occurs.

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