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Rendall, Michelle (2012)
Publisher: Zurich: University of Zurich, Department of Economics
Languages: English
Types: Research
Subjects: Department of Economics, J31, Geschlecht, Structural change, job tasks, female employment, wage gap, Latin America, Asia, Strukturwandel, Entwicklungsländer, Arbeitsmarkt, Diskriminierung, Geschlecht, Gleichberechtigung, O31, O33, Wage Gap, Latin America, Lateinamerika, Erwerbstätigkeit, Weibliche Arbeitskräfte, Asia, J20, J23, Female Employment, Asien, J24, Job Tasks, 330 Economics, Structural Change, Structural change, job tasks, female employment, wage gap, Latin America, Asia, Lohndifferenzierung
jel: jel:J20, jel:O33, jel:O31, jel:J31, jel:J24, jel:J23
ddc: ddc:330
This paper examines the evolution of female labor market outcomes from 1987 to 2008 by assessing the role of changing labor demand requirements in four developing countries: Brazil, Mexico, India and Thailand. The results highlight the importance of structural change in reducing gender disparities by decreasing the labor demand for physical attributes. The results show that India, the country with the greatest physical labor requirements, exhibits the largest labor market gender inequality. In contrast, Brazil's labor requirements have followed a similar trend seen in the United States, reducing gender inequality in both wages and labor force participation.

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