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Lei, Hongxia; Gruetter, Rolf (2006)
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Blood-Brain Barrier, Disease Models, Animal, Hypoglycemia/metabolism, Reference Values, Blood Glucose/metabolism, Glucose/metabolism, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Brain/metabolism, Animals, Rats, Article
ddc: ddc:616.0757
While chronic hypoglycaemia has been reported to increase unidirectional glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to increase GLUT1 expression at the endothelium, the effect on steady-state brain d-glucose and brain glycogen content is currently unknown. Brain glucose and glycogen concentrations were directly measured in vivo using localized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) following 12-14 days of hypoglycaemia. Brain glucose content was significantly increased by 48%, which is consistent with an increase in the maximal glucose transport rate, Tmax, by 58% compared with the sham-treated animals. The localized 13C NMR measurements of brain glucose were directly validated by comparison with biochemically determined brain glucose content after rapid focused microwave fixation (1.4 s at 4 kW). Both in vivo MRS and biochemical measurements implied that brain glycogen content was not affected by chronic hypoglycaemia, consistent with brain glucose being a major factor controlling brain glycogen content. We conclude that the increased glucose transporter expression in chronic hypoglycaemia leads to increased brain glucose content at a given level of glycaemia. Such increased brain glucose concentrations can result in a lowered glycaemic threshold of counter-regulation observed in chronic hypoglycaemia. © 2006 The Authors.
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