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Zaehle, Tino; Sandmann, Pascale; Thorne, Jeremy D; Jäncke, Lutz; Herrmann, Christoph S (2011)
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal: BMC Neuroscience
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Institute of Psychology, Research Article, Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry, RC321-571, Neurophysiology and neuropsychology, 150 Psychology, QP351-495

Abstract

Background

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a technique that can systematically modify behaviour by inducing changes in the underlying brain function. In order to better understand the neuromodulatory effect of tDCS, the present study examined the impact of tDCS on performance in a working memory (WM) task and its underlying neural activity. In two experimental sessions, participants performed a letter two-back WM task after sham and either anodal or cathodal tDCS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC).

Results

Results showed that tDCS modulated WM performance by altering the underlying oscillatory brain activity in a polarity-specific way. We observed an increase in WM performance and amplified oscillatory power in the theta and alpha bands after anodal tDCS whereas cathodal tDCS interfered with WM performance and decreased oscillatory power in the theta and alpha bands under posterior electrode sides.

Conclusions

The present study demonstrates that tDCS can alter WM performance by modulating the underlying neural oscillations. This result can be considered an important step towards a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in tDCS-induced modulations of WM performance, which is of particular importance, given the proposal to use electrical brain stimulation for the therapeutic treatment of memory deficits in clinical settings.

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