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Akdag, Beyza; Telci, Emine Aslan; Cavlak, Ugur (2013)
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Journal: International Journal of Gerontology
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Geriatrics, cognition, geriatric assessment, quality of life, RC952-954.6, Geriatrics and Gerontology
Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the influential factors of cognitive function in older adults. Methods: In this study, 377 older adults (mean age: 74.71 ± 6.15 years) were examined. The Hodkinson Abbreviated Mental Test (HAMT) was used to describe cognitive function of the individuals. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL-4) survey tool was used to measure the quality of life. Possible influential factors of cognitive function were also detected. The following independent variables were included in the logistic regression analysis: age, gender, education level, residency, smoking habit, musculoskeletal pain, medication use, number of unhealthy mental days, number of unhealthy physical days, and activity limitation days. Results: The results indicated that the elderly with cognitive impairment showed low scores in terms of the three parameters of the CDC HRQOL-4. The findings also indicate that the following variables were found to significantly affect cognitive function: (1) age, (2) residency (rest home), (3) smoking (yes or quit), and (4) number of unhealthy mental days. Conclusion: Older adults should be assessed in terms of factors related to cognition, such as age, residency, smoking, and mood in order to plan the most suitable geriatric care.

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