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Turner Nancy; Lans Cheryl (2011)
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal: Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Other systems of medicine, ectoparasites, endoparasites, poultry, rabbits, RZ201-999, British Columbia, Botany, QK1-989, ethnoveterinary medicine, Research

Abstract

Plants used for treating endo- and ectoparasites of rabbits and poultry in British Columbia included Arctium lappa (burdock), Artemisia sp. (wormwood), Chenopodium album (lambsquarters) and C. ambrosioides (epazote), Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle), Juniperus spp. (juniper), Mentha piperita (peppermint), Nicotiana sp. (tobacco), Papaver somniferum (opium poppy), Rubus spp. (blackberry and raspberry relatives), Symphytum officinale (comfrey), Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion), Thuja plicata (western redcedar) and Urtica dioica (stinging nettle).

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