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Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L; Pedersen, Mogens T; Mortensen, Peter; Andersen, Christoffer H; Pedersen, Mette M; Boysen, Marianne; Roessler, Kirsten K; Hannerz, Harald; Mortensen, Ole S; Sj?gaard, Gisela (2011)
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Research Article, Diseases of the musculoskeletal system, RC925-935

Abstract

Background

Although leisure-time physical activity is important for health, adherence to regular exercise is challenging for many adults. The workplace may provide an optimal setting to reach a large proportion of the adult population needing regular physical exercise. This study evaluates the effect of implementing strength training at the workplace on non-specific neck and shoulder pain among industrial workers.

Methods

Cluster-randomized controlled trial involving 537 adults from occupations with high prevalence of neck and shoulder pain (industrial production units). Participants were randomized to 20 weeks of high-intensity strength training for the neck and shoulders three times a week (n = 282) or a control group receiving advice to stay physically active (n = 255). The strength training program followed principles of progressive overload and periodization. The primary outcome was changes in self-reported neck and shoulder pain intensity (scale 0-9).

Results

85% of the participants followed the strength training program on a weekly basis. In the training group compared with the control group, neck pain intensity decreased significantly (-0.6, 95% CI -1.0 to -0.1) and shoulder pain intensity tended to decrease (-0.2, 95% CI -0.5 to 0.1, P = 0.07). For pain-cases at baseline (pain intensity > = 3) the odds ratio - in the training group compared with the control group - for being a non-case at follow-up (pain intensity < 3) was 2.0 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.2) for the neck and 3.9 (95% CI 1.7 to 9.4) for the shoulders.

Conclusion

High-intensity strength training relying on principles of progressive overload can be successfully implemented at industrial workplaces, and results in significant reductions of neck and shoulder pain.

Trial registration

NCT01071980.