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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Yong Miao; Yabin Sun; Wenjun Wang; Benjun Du; Shun-e Xiao; Yijue Hu; Zhiqi Hu
Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Journal: PLoS ONE
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Biotechnology, Research Article, Biology, Medicine, Hair and Nail Diseases, Drug Research and Development, Dermatologic and Cosmetic Surgery, Reconstructive Surgery, Q, R, Dermatology, Drug Discovery, Drugs and Devices, Biochemistry, Science, Ethnopharmacology, Surgery

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: integumentary system, sense organs, otorhinolaryngologic diseases
Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has been traditionally used to check hair loss and stimulate hair growth in East Asia. Several companies produce shampoo containing an extract of ginger claimed to have anti-hair loss and hair growth promotion properties. However, there is no scientific evidence to back up these claims. This study was undertaken to measure 6-gingerol, the main active component of ginger, on hair shaft elongation in vitro and hair growth in vivo, and to investigate its effect on human dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in vivo and in vitro. 6-Gingerol suppressed hair growth in hair follicles in culture and the proliferation of cultured DPCs. The growth inhibition of DPCs by 6-gingerol in vitro may reflect a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Similar results were obtained in vivo. The results of this study showed that 6-gingerol does not have the ability to promote hair growth, on the contrary, can suppress human hair growth via its inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects on DPCs in vitro, and can cause prolongation of telogen phase in vivo. Thus, 6-gingerol rather than being a hair growth stimulating drug, it is a potential hair growth suppressive drug; i.e. for hair removal.

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