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Ben Wadham; Grace Skrzypiec; Phillip Slee (2014)
Publisher: SAGE Publishing
Journal: SAGE Open
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: History of scholarship and learning. The humanities, AZ20-999, Social Sciences, H
What are young Australians’ understandings of, and attitudes to, the military and military service? This article describes a pilot study of 320 young Australian university students’ attitudes to the military and military service during a time when Australia was engaged in the Afghanistan war. The main purpose of this study was to develop a survey instrument for further work in researching civil–military relations in Australia. Civil–military relations describe the complex set of relationships between the civil and military spheres. The role of the military, the relationship between the state and the military, the division of labor between civilian and military entities, foreign policy, and knowledge of military service are some of the fields that constitute a study of civil–military relations. This article reports on beliefs about, and attitudes to the specificities of military service and responses to the broader field of civil–military relations.
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