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Line Nybro Petersen (2017)
Publisher: Organization for Transformative Works
Journal: Transformative Works and Cultures
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Aging, Benedict Cumberbatch, Fan studies, Gerontology, Mediatization, Sherlock Holmes, Subjective age, Communication. Mass media, P87-96
This article uses e-mail interviews with nine female fans to explore what it means to be a fan over the age of 50 of the popular BBC drama Sherlock (2010–). The research aims to better understand the role of fandom in later life, in particular how the participants in this study negotiate their perceptions of their subjective age in relation to being a fan in this part of their life course. This study combines theory on cultural gerontology with fan studies and mediatization theory in order to understand the dynamics and processes that guide fans' negotiations of subjective age as well as the role of fan practices and the affordances of social media in these processes. I argue that fandom, as a manifestation of a mediatized culture, augments the relevance of subjective age and informs the way in which participants in middle and later life perceive and negotiate their own subjective age specifically in relation to fandom as youth culture, women's passion, and creativity.
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