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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
G. HOLLÓ; A. KOVÁCS; G. ZSARNÓCZAY; J. SEREGI; I. HOLLÓ (2008)
Publisher: Agroprint Timisoara
Journal: Scientific Papers Animal Science and Biotechnologies
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Agriculture, Q, linseed, S, fatty acids, T, Science, beef, Technology

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: food and beverages
In this study the opportunities for enhancing the beneficial fatty acid in beef was examined. The effect of diet (extensive vs. intensive diet, forage to concentrate ratio, feeding concentrates rich in n-3 fatty acids) and the breed (old: Hungarian Grey, dual purpose: Hungarian Simmental, dairy: Hungarian Holstein-Friesian) was investigated on the fatty acid composition of beef. Findings reveal that the extensive diet with linseed supplemented concentrate influenced the n-6/n-3 ratio and the CLA content of longissimus muscle more advantageous concerning human nutrition. The meat from Hungarian Grey (HG) contained more CLA and less n-6 fatty acids than that of Holstein-Friesian bulls. The different forage to concentrate ratio with/without linseed supplementation did not significantly affect the performance and slaughter traits in Hungarian Simmental (HS) young bulls. The wider forage to linseed concentrate ratio caused slightly higher dressing percentage, meat and fat proportion and lower bone in carcass. The effect of muscle type on chemical composition of muscles is more significant than that of the diet. SFA and MUFA were affected by muscle type, n-3 fatty acids and n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio of the diet. The level of cis-9 trans-11 CLA (mg/100 g) was influenced by muscle type, but not by diet.
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