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Amdam, Rolv Petter (2016)
Publisher: Cambridge Univesity Press
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:

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ACM Ref: ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION, GeneralLiterature_MISCELLANEOUS
The accepted and peer reviewed manuscript The managerial revolution drove the rise of business schools in the United States and business schools contributed by graduating professional managers. Before World War II, however, the effect of an MBA degree was modest, causing great concern to leading business schools. Harvard Business School—in order to increase this impact—began in the mid-1920s to develop nondegree programs for potential top executives. In 1945, by drawing on the experiences of certain short-lived programs and the extraordinary situation during the war, Harvard Business School launched its Advanced Management Program, which became a global role model for executive education. 1. Forfatterversjon
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