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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Coughlan, David (2009)
Publisher: McFarland and Company Ltd
Languages: English
Types: Part of book or chapter of book
Subjects: comic heroes
peer-reviewed After the release of the film Superman Returns (2006), it was suggested that " It was inevitable .. . that after 9/11 America's greatest superhero would come back to protect the threatened city of Metropolis" (French 2006, 15). In a time of need, a vulnerable populace, even an entire nation, could feel shel tered by the power of Superman. This has held true since Superman's very first appearance in Action Comics #1 in 1938, but what has also always been clear is that domestic security is as important to Superman as national security. Superman's second-ever heroic adventure is not saving the world but sav ing the life of a victim of domestic violence threatened by a knife-wielding husband. Since the moment of his creation, therefore, this hero of heroes has defended the idea of the home as a place of refuge from violence. PUBLISHED Peer reviewed
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