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Eichenbaum, Adam; Bavelier, Daphné; Green, C. Shawn (2014)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Job training and video games, Video games and learning, Video games and cognition, Video games and the elderly
ddc: ddc:150

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: ComputingMilieux_PERSONALCOMPUTING
The authors review recent research that reveals how today’s video games instantiate naturally and effectively many principles psychologists, neuroscientists, and educators believe critical for learning. A large body of research exists showing that the effects of these games are much broader. In fact, some types of commercial games have been proven to enhance basic perceptual and cognitive skills. These effects are significant enough that educators use these games for such practical, real-world purposes as training surgeons and rehabilitating individuals with perceptual or cognitive deficits. Although many individuals may still consider video games nothing more than mindless fun, the authors argue that games serve also as serious tools for good.
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