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Stavreva Veselinovska, Snezana (2011)
Publisher: 1st National Agriculture Congress and Exposition on behalf of Ali Numan Kıraç with International Participation April 27-30, 2011
Types: Article
Subjects: Biological sciences, Earth and related environmental sciences

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: fungi
Environmental pollution with heavy metals present a real threat to wildlife because the metals cannot be naturally decomposed as is the case with organic pollutants, and as such they can survive in the environment while accumulating the heavy metals in different parts. Pollution with metals can affect different organisms in the environment, such as microorganisms, plants and animals, but the degree of toxicity depends on the species. Microorganisms have different mechanisms of coping with a variety of toxic metals. Large number of metals is essential for growth of microorganisms, but some can be very harmful too. This is happening because heavy metals have the ability to form complexes with proteins and make them inactive, for example, inactivation on enzymes. Many heavy metals are detrimental to microorganisms even at very low concentrations. We have investigated the resistance of lead as heavy metal on microorganism populations living on soil contaminated with heavy metals. Resistance to soluble lead was investigated in two different bacterias Pseudomonas marginalis and Bacillus megaterium. The population of microorganisms showed different response to the heavy metal.
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